when darkness came on, and the fire about the sacrifice was cool, all of them put on most beautiful azure robes, and, sitting on the ground, at night, over the embers of the sacrifices by which they had sworn, (120c) and extinguishing all the fire about the temple, they received and gave judgment, if any of them had an accusation to bring against any one; and when they given judgment, at daybreak they wrote down their sentences on a golden tablet, and dedicated it together with their robes to be a memorial. Now, therefore,�and this is the purpose of all that I have been saying,�I am ready to tell my tale, not in summary outline only but in full detail just as I heard it. Consider then, Socrates, if this narrative is suited to the purpose, (26e) or whether we should seek for some other instead. For myself, I know not whether I could recall to mind all that I heard yesterday; but as to the account I heard such a great time ago, I should be immensely surprised if a single detail of it has escaped me. TIMAEUS    Moreover, immediately after daybreak I related this same story to our friends here, so that they might share in my rich provision of discourse. Timaeus. Truly, as is often said, the lessons of our childhood make wonderful impression on our memories; for I am not sure that I could remember all the discourse of yesterday, but I should be much surprised if I forgot any of these things which I have heard very long ago. Critias is the second of a projected trilogy of dialogues, preceded by Timaeus and followed by Hermocrates. Listen then, Socrates, to a tale which, though passing strange, is yet wholly true, as Solon, (20e) the wisest of the Seven, once upon a time declared. I will tell you the reason of this: Solon, who was intending to use the tale for his poem, enquired into the meaning of the names, and found that the early Egyptians in writing them down had translated them into their own language, and he recovered the meaning of the several names and when copying them out again translated them into our language. And this region, (118b) all along the island, faced towards the South and was sheltered from the Northern blasts. There was an abundance of wood for carpenter's work, and sufficient maintenance for tame and wild animals. The whole country was said by him to be very lofty and precipitous on the side of the sea, but the country immediately about and surrounding the city was a level plain, itself surrounded by mountains which descended towards the sea; it was smooth and even, and of an oblong shape, extending in one direction three thousand stadia, but across the centre inland it was two thousand stadia. The city and citizens, which you yesterday described to us in fiction, we will now transfer to the world of reality. (17c) SOCRATES    Certainly, Critias, we will grant your request, and we will grant the same by anticipation to Hermocrates, as well as to you and Timaeus; for I have no doubt that when his turn comes a little while hence, (108b) he will make the same request which you have made. So all these, themselves and their descendants, dwelt for many generations bearing rule over many other islands throughout the sea, and holding sway besides, as was previously stated, over the Mediterranean peoples as far as Egypt and Tuscany. You are welcome to hear about them, Solon, said the priest, both for your own sake and for that of your city, and above all, for the sake of the goddess who is the common patron and parent and educator of both our cities. And of these citizens the names are preserved, but their works have vanished owing to the repeated destruction of their successors and the length of the intervening periods. It was originally a quadrangle, rectilinear for the most part, and elongated; and what it lacked of this shape they made right by means of a trench dug round about it. There were also in the interior of the temple other images which had been dedicated by private persons. In two of Plato’s great works, the Timaeus and the Critias, Plato describes an Athenian civilization in dialogues between Critias, Socrates, Timaeus and Hermocrates.Plato’s Critias recounts the story of the mighty island kingdom Atlantis and its attempt to conquer Athens, which failed due to the ordered society of the Athenians. Some of their buildings were simple, but in others they put together different stones, varying the colour to please the eye, and to be a natural source of delight. It received the streams which came down from the mountains and after circling round the plain, and coming towards the city on this side and on that, it discharged them thereabouts into the sea. All the outside of the temple, with the exception of the pinnacles, they covered with silver, and the pinnacles with gold. And the name of his younger twin-brother, (114b) who had for his portion the extremity of the island near the pillars of Heracles up to the part of the country now called Gadeira after the name of that region, was Eumelus in Greek, but in the native tongue Gadeirus,�which fact may have given its title to the country. A harbor and docks on the outer zone for sea passage. Like as we previously stated concerning the allotments of the Gods, that they portioned out the whole earth, here into larger allotments and there into smaller, and provided for themselves (113c) shrines and sacrifices, even so Poseidon took for his allotment the island of Atlantis and settled therein the children whom he had begotten of a mortal woman in a region of the island of the following description. And although I very well know that my request may appear to be somewhat and discourteous, I must make it nevertheless. 3.5 The Atlantis myth. Marwan Rashed and Thomas Auffret from the Université de Paris-Sorbonne, Département de Philosophie, argue that there allegedly are discrepancies between the dialogues Timaeus and Critias which would indicate that the Critias is not from Plato. The leader was required to furnish for the war the sixth portion of a war-chariot, so as to make up a total of ten thousand chariots; also two horses and riders for them, (119b) and a pair of chariot-horses without a seat, accompanied by a horseman who could fight on foot carrying a small shield, and having a charioteer who stood behind the man-at-arms to guide the two horses; also, he was bound to furnish two heavy armed soldiers, two slingers, three stone-shooters and three javelin-men, who were light-armed, and four sailors to make up the complement of twelve hundred ships.
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